GRAVES FAMILY BULLETIN

 

Vol. 18, No. 6, Nov. 19, 2016

 

A Free, Occasional, Online Summary of Items of Interest to Descendants of all Families of Graves, Greaves, Grieves, Grave, and other spelling variations Worldwide

 

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Copyright © 2016 by the Graves Family Association and Kenneth V. Graves.  All rights reserved.

 

Information on how to be removed from the subscription list is at the end of this bulletin.  If you received this bulletin directly, then you are already subscribed.  If you received it from a friend and want to subscribe, send an email message with your full name to ken.graves@gravesfa.org.

 

Click on these links to visit the GFA website and our Facebook page.

 

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CONTENTS

 

** General Comments

** Annual Family Tree DNA Holiday Sale

** Y-SNP Testing: New Discoveries and More Action Needed

** Frequently Asked Questions and Things You Should Know

** Newly Available Irish and English Records

** More Articles of General Interest

** Interesting and Helpful Articles in the FamilySearch Blog

** Updates to the GFA Website

** Graves Family Winners in the U.S. Elections

** More Helpful Articles About Genetic Genealogy

** To Submit Material to this Bulletin & Other Things

 

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GENERAL COMMENTS

 

Wow! The last Graves Family Bulletin was published on Aug. 12.  Much too long!  This new issue is ready at last.

 

Y-DNA SNP testing via next generation testing such as Big Y and SNP Packs is beginning to give us much more information, proving connections and disproving relationships that were only suspected before.  And whole genome testing (not yet providing results, but maybe soon) is fast approaching.  Give the article on Y-SNP testing in this issue your special attention, and do what you can to support its recommendations.  The year-end holiday sale at Family Tree DNA will make some of this testing somewhat less expensive.

 

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ANNUAL FAMILY TREE DNA HOLIDAY SALE

 

Family Tree DNA’s annual sale of DNA tests is here.  The prices are listed below.  To see the prices for upgrades (for instance, from Y37 to Y111), click on the Upgrade link on your personal FTDNA page.

 

FTDNA is also giving away coupons (called Holiday Rewards) for their most popular DNA tests.  New coupons will be posted every Monday.  If you are a FTDNA customer, go to your personal page and click on the link at the top of your page.  They are also allowing all their customers to share those coupons with anyone else by just entering your name and the recipient’s email address.  The coupons are only good for 7 days, so check your personal page on FTDNA and either use the coupon or offer to share it with someone else.  We will try to publish a list of coupons on the Graves Family Association Facebook page also.  Check your Holiday Rewards to see what you have.

 

Coupons I presently have that you are welcome to use (all expiring on 11/21) are:

$75 off Big Y, code R150V1JMTLYG

$75 off Big Y, code R150V1JMTLYG

$100 off Big Y, code R15PLOLCABFH

$75 off Big Y, code R15527LJBV7W

$40 off YDNA67, code R152X56IZYF2

$40 off Y-DNA67, code R15SCEPY0V8F

$60 off YDNA111, code R150V1JMTLYG

$60 off YDNA111, code R15RONC6OWM0

$10 off Y37, Y67 or Y111, code R15HV79FZBXC

$10 off mtDNA, code R157JCVQRM85

$10 off mtDNA, code R15SPIFWPFZH

$10 off mtDNA, code R15GBW7N7YUM

$20 off mtDNA, code R15XNH99IEGT

$40 off mtFull, code R1548FRY2SVA

$40 off mtFull, code R15KYPRHJCZR

10% off Y37, Y67 or Y111, code R15KPDX4Z8IU

10% off Y37, Y67 or Y111, code R15FKW7JIF5U

10% off Y37, Y67 or Y111, code R15RZZILB6KT

$10 off Y37, Y67 or Y111, code R15DCGX9QZ78

 

TEST & DESCRIPTION

USUAL PRICE

SALE PRICE

Family Finder (Autosomal)

$79

$59

FF + Y37

$248

$188

FF + Y67

$347

$278

FF + mtFull Sequence

$278

$228

Father’s Line (males only):

 

 

Y37

$169

$139

Y67

$268

$229

Y111

$359

$319

Mother’s Line:

 

 

mtDNA+ (HVR1 + HVR2)

$79

$79

mtFull Sequence

$199

$179

 

 

 

Comprehensive Genome (FF+Y67+mtFull Sequence)

$546

$457

 

 

 

Big Y (Explore your deep paternal ancestry, and find SNPs unique to you.)

$575

$525

 

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Y-SNP TESTING : NEW DISCOVERIES AND MORE ACTION NEEDED

 

The subject of Y-SNP testing to determine whether a person is genetically part of a particular Graves/Greaves family, whether one family is part of another, and how various families are connected, was discussed in the lead article of the last bulletin in August.  This article will discuss some of the things that have been learned since then.  It will also review many of the major family groups, what we know about them now, and what should be done with DNA testing to help us learn more.  See the Y-DNA page of the website for more information, especially the haplogroup chart links at the bottom of that page, and the master table of Y-DNA test results (via first link at the top of the Y-DNA page).  Also, on the charts page (numerical listing of genealogies page) are links to charts of many of the genealogies with emphasis on which lines have had Y-DNA tests, and also charts of how various genealogies sharing the same Graves/Greaves ancestor may be connected; DNA testing is expected to let us eventually discover the correct connections and ancestries.

 

Most Graves/Greaves families are in haplogroup R, a few are in haplogroup I, and a very small number are in several other haplogroups.  All the families that have taken a Y-DNA test are included on the master table of Y-DNA test results.  Since Y-haplogroups are determined by which SNPs a person has, the haplogroup of a person who has not taken a SNP test is estimated from the STR test results of that person.  (See the help sections of the Family Tree DNA website, the ISOGG website, or previous articles I have written if you need to know what some of these terms mean.)

 

In general, if you are in haplogroup R1b and have not already taken a SNP test, you should join the “R1b All Subclade Gateway Project”.  The volunteers in this project will try to predict you haplogroup beyond where you are presently predicted.  Joining any haplogroup project is free and may be very helpful.  The administrators of these projects are volunteers, like all of us, and are very knowledgeable.  To join any project, go to your private page on Family Tree DNA, click on Projects at top of page, click on “Join a project”, scroll down to find the project you want, click on that project and follow the instructions.  For Y-DNA haplogroup projects, scroll down to that section and click on R for R-haplogroup projects (or I for I-haplogroup projects).

 

If you have only taken a Y-DNA12 or Y-DNA25 test, it would be helpful to upgrade that to at least a 37-marker test, and preferably to a 111-marker test.

 

At least one person (and usually more than one for a genealogy with more testers) should take the Big Y test.  Also, if you are Ungrouped, you should probably take a Big Y test to find your connections.  If you can’t afford the Big Y test and you can’t get anyone else to share the cost with you, you can test with a recommended SNP Pack.  In general, only test with SNP Packs if you don’t plan to take a next-generation test (such as Big Y); otherwise you will pay for testing some of the same SNPs twice.  To get help and a recommendation on which SNP Pack or other test to order, be sure to join the appropriate haplogroup project.  To see which SNP Packs are available and to order the one you want, either go to your personal page on FTDNA, and click on the “Haplotree & SNPs” link in the Y-DNA section, or click on Upgrade at the top right of the page, scroll down to “Advanced Tests” and click on “Buy Now”, click on the box next to Test Type and select SNP Pack, click on Find, and then click on Add next to the SNP Pack you want.  You should usually select the Pack that is farthest down the SNP tree but still within the part of the tree you are confident you belong to.  To see the structure of the tree, look at the tree on your FTDNA page or one of those on the GFA website at the bottom of the Y-DNA page.

 

If you take the Big Y test, encourage your close matches to take the test also.  The more men who take this advanced test, the farther down the tree toward the present we will be able to go.

 

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES TO YOU AND OTHERS OF TAKING TESTS LIKE BIG Y?

           Finding where your Graves/Greaves ancestor lived at a particular time in the past, possibly allowing tracking of their migration and dispersion paths.  This comes partly via some descendants knowing where their ancestors lived.

           Discovering about when the surname first began to be used for your particular line.

           Finding how your Graves/Greaves family is related to other Graves/Greaves families.

           Finding how your family connects with other families that share a common Graves/Greaves ancestor.

           Finding SNPs belonging to specific branches or even to people within branches of large families, allowing confirmation of lineages and proper placement of previously unplaced segments of families.

           Much better identification and placement of people of unknown ancestry, such as adoptees.

 

I1-085 GROUP, GRAVES/GREEVES FAMILIES OF NORTHERN IRELAND

Most of the members of this group trace their ancestry back to New Castle Co., Delaware, but some trace it to County Louth, Ireland.  It is believed that the family is originally from Scotland.  All tested descendants match very closely and all are estimated as I-M253.  It is strongly recommended that some of these men take the Big Y test, especially a couple from gen. 85 (not closely related), and at least one from gen. 35, 50, and 472.  Everyone in this group should join the I1 YDNA Haplogroup Project and possibly the I1-Z58 Haplogroup Project.  There seems to be no SNP pack available yet.

 

I1-316 GROUP, GREAVES/GRAVES FAMILIES OF HOLMFIRTH, YORKSHIRE

Although there are only two men who have tested in this group, from different genealogies, they both match at 37 markers.  The one who has not taken a SNP test should take the Big Y test.  It is interesting to see that at 37 markers, both men match a number of Beeson/Beason and Norton men.  They may all be from the same area of Yorkshire before surnames.  It would be worthwhile encouraging those men to take a Big Y test also.

 

I2-078 GROUP, GRAVES FAMILIES OF SC, GA, AL & AR

Most of those in this group are I2-M223.  All should join the I-M223 Y-Haplogroup Project.  There is an I2-M223 SNP Pack, but taking a Big Y test would be much better. 

 

I2-090 GROUP, GRAVES FAMILIES OF HALIFAX CO., VA & TN

This group only has 3 members presently, from genealogy 90 and 280.  They are all haplogroup I-M223.  All should join the I-M223 Y-Haplogroup Project.  Taking a Big Y test would also be very helpful.

 

R1-013 GROUP

For the samples in group R1-013, the one that is R-SRY2627 also needs to take the R1b-Z198 SNP Pack test.  At least one of the others in that group that is gen. 13 should take a Big Y test.  It also appears in that group that gen. 106 and possibly gen. 928 may not be part of the same family as gen. 13, and one of them from each genealogy should take the Big Y test if possible, or at least the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack test.

 

One major discovery is that the gen. 228 sample (mentioned in the R1-228 section farther along in this article) that has been renamed as gen. 591 is also descended from SNP R-SRY2627, so may be closely related to gen. 13, and perhaps even more closely related to gen. 106 (based on the master table of Y-DNA results).  It needs to take the R1b-Z198 SNP Pack.  It is also interesting because the known descendants live in Australia.

 

R1-018 GROUP, GRAVES/GREAVES FAMILIES OF CAROLINE, ALBEMARLE & HALIFAX COUNTIES, VA & SC

There seem to be two subgroups within this group.  One includes genealogies 18, 49, 84, 103, and 906.  The other includes genealogies 57, 145, 155, 217, and 851.  All those who have tested are predicted haplogroup R-M269.  The ideal action would be for one person in each genealogy to take a Big Y test.  Definitely at least one person in each of the subgroups should take a Big Y test, and if this can’t be done at least one person in each subgroup should take the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack test.

 

R1-037 GROUP, GENEALOGY 37, WILLIAM GRAVES OF SC & TN

This has been added to the master table of Y-DNA test results as group R1-037.  The only matches within the entire FTDNA database for these family members at the 25 or 37-marker level are with each other.  They are all presently predicted as haplogroup R-M269.  My recommendation is for at least one of them to take the Big Y test if possible.  The alternative is for at least one to take the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack at $99.  No additional sample should be needed for either test.

 

R1-083 GROUP, GRAVES FAMILIES OF LINCOLNSHIRE, ENGLAND

This family group appears to be from Lincolnshire, England, and perhaps also from Norfolk, England.  The known descendants in the U.S. are descended from Samuel Graves of Lynn, MA.  All tested descendants are from SNP R-M269, and my recommendation is the same as for the preceding group (R1-037).  One gen. 428 descendant and at least one gen. 83 descendant should take the Big Y test.

 

R1-105 GROUP, GENEALOGY 105, JOHANN SEBASTIAN GRAFF/GRAVES

One member of this group has tested as haplogroup R-Z156, but all others are estimated as R-M269.  As with other groups in this situation, it would be best if a couple of people from this group could take a Big Y test, but otherwise the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack at $99 is recommended for one other person to confirm the R-Z156 haplogroup.  (Kit 145891 has a coupon for $50 off Big Y, expiring Nov. 21, and perhaps others do also.)

 

R1-168 GROUP, FAMILIES OF HERTFORD/HARLOW AREA IN ENGLAND, AND CT & VA IN U.S.

There are 3 major genealogies in this group. They are genealogy 169 (Capt. Thomas Graves of VA, via son John), genealogy 168 (Thomas Graves of CT), and genealogy 65 (Deacon George Graves of CT).  At least one person in each of those genealogies should take a Big Y test.  We want to determine how gen. 168 and 65 are related.  Much more importantly, however, we want to know how gen. 168 and gen. 169 (through son John) are connected, and how long ago one split off from the other.  This is one of the crucial questions in proving who Capt. Thomas Graves was and who his descendants are.

 

GENEALOGY 169, CAPT. THOMAS GRAVES OF VA

Finding and proving the ancestry of Capt. Thomas Graves of VA is one of the most difficult tasks imaginable.  It was believed that Capt. Thomas Graves had 3 sons, John, Thomas, and Francis, and that the traced descendants of all 3 were all his genetic descendants.  When these descendants began to be tested in 2001, it became apparent that those from each son had different DNA.  The descendants of son John are in the R1-168 group and are considered the branch with the most solidly researched line and the ones most likely to carry the DNA of Capt. Thomas Graves.  The descendants of son Thomas are in groups R1-169a and R1-169b (mentioned in the next paragraph), with the R1-169a believed to be the most likely to descend from son Thomas.  The descendants of son Francis have been put in a separate genealogy 220, and are part of group R1-228.  If you look at the haplogroup chart on chart R-Y-SNP-chart.pdf, it is apparent that these 3 groups are from widely different parts of the genetic tree.  Proving which part of the tree is the one that Capt. Thomas Graves was part of will require more testing of each of the lines.  See the discussion in the R1-168 group for the son John, and the R1-228 group for the study of son Francis (I realize that it is now generally accepted that Capt. Thomas Graves had a daughter Frances rather than a son Francis, but until genetic proof is available we can’t afford to completely discount any possibility, not matter how slight).

 

Proving the genetic identity of Capt. Thomas Graves will also require using autosomal DNA to determine which one of the purported sons is related to the daughters of Capt. Thomas Graves.  We need one or more volunteers to work on this autosomal DNA study!

 

The R1-169 group for the descendants of son Thomas has been split into two groups:

           R1-169a, Thomas, son of Capt. Thomas Graves of VA via SNP R-BY12203

           R1-169b, Thomas, son of Capt. Thomas Graves of VA via SNP R-S6881

It appears that R1-169a is likely to be the group descended from son Thomas, but we will see what happens as the SNP trees of these two groups develop.

 

There is still much opportunity for traditional research on the family of Capt. Thomas Graves.  Jean Wall (a descendant of Capt. Thomas Graves and a long-time researcher) recently wrote “When at Family History Library in Salt Lake, I talked to a man with FamilySearch who said it is possible to go to archives in London, probably sitting on floor (i.e., in the main reading room), looking at the old records to find something on GRAVES & CROSHAW before Virginia and on trips back.  He said those records have not been filmed.”  She also mentioned that if anyone decides to do research in London, they should contact the archives before leaving the U.S.

 

R1-197 GROUP, GREAVES FAMILIES OF YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND & SC

Those in group R1-197 who are predicted to be in haplogroup R-M512 don’t presently have much option other than to take a Big Y test, since there seems to be no haplogroup project and there are no SNP packs to help them.

 

R1-228 GROUP

Genealogy 228 (Greaves family of Beeley, Derbyshire) has been traced back to 1490, and has been believed to be the progenitor of all the families in the R1-228 group.  However, we only have two Y-DNA samples from gen. 228 (and one has just been renamed as gen. 591), their test results don’t agree with each other, and the one that seems to match the R1-228 group is not a very close match.  We need:

           More descendants of gen. 228 to test

           SNP testing of both gen. 228 samples. The closest match is estimated as R-M269 and needs to take the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack test.  The other one                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             is a closer match to gen. 13 (William Graves and Elizabeth ‑‑‑‑‑‑ of VA, NC, TN & KY), is presently tested as R-SRY2627, and is discussed in the R1-013 Group comments.

 

For each of the many genealogies in this group, one Big Y test per genealogy would be a marvelous start.  Presently there are only Big Y tests for genealogies 150, 152, 166, 214, and 262.

 

R1-377 GROUP, GRAVE/GRAVES FAMILIES OF CAMBRIDGESHIRE & CUMBRIA, ENGLAND

Two members of this group have tested as haplogroup R-Z326, but all others are estimated as R-M269.  It would be best if one person from each genealogy of this group could take a Big Y test, but otherwise the R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack at $99 is recommended.

 

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS AND THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW

 

How can I find what genealogy I am part of?

Post your question on the GFA Facebook page or ask Ken Graves.  (If you don’t know how to contact Ken, just look at the contact link on every page of the GFA website.)

 

How can I find who else is descended from that genealogy?

Your first step should be to look at the Researchers List on the GFA Facebook page.  This a series of files first created by Ken Graves, then modified by Concetta Phillips, and now put into what we hope will be an easier-to-use form by Trudy Graves. Her instructions are to go to the Facebook page and then: “Click on files, located at the top of the Graves Family Association Facebook page. Find the file that would have your genealogy number, click on it. There is a hyperlink to Google docs, click on it. Look at list. Don't see your name? Find the spot in the document where your name should go-click and start typing. The changes are automatically saved, so once you are done, just close that window.”  If your name isn’t on the list, you can add it.

 

After that, you can post on the Facebook page, asking for any other descendants, and you can ask me (Ken Graves).  Finally, if you are really ambitious and eager to find more cousins, you can post on online bulletin boards and email lists, and search Ancestry.com and elsewhere for people who have posted family trees for your family.

 

How can I find out what immigrant Graves/Greaves family in America (or what family in Europe) my part of the family (my genealogy) is descended from?

Ask on our Facebook page, ask Ken Graves, or go to the GFA website and use the Search box on the top left of each page to do your own search.

 

How can I get my family information included in the appropriate genealogy?

Send it to Ken Graves and hope that he can take the time to add it.  Unfortunately, there is presently no better way.  I am open to any suggestions anyone may have.

 

Why aren’t the most recent generations of most genealogies posted on the Graves Family Association website, and how can I see this information?

This is a privacy issue.  Many people don’t want information about living people to be online (even though we may use social media to post our most intimate thoughts and actions).  If you contact me, I can provide you with that information.

 

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NEWLY AVAILABLE IRISH AND ENGLISH RECORDS

 

NEWLY AVAILABLE IRISH RECORDS

I recently noticed an article titled “Tracing Your Irish Ancestors” in the Sept. 11 issue of The Irish Times.  You can see it here.  Although not many Graves/Greaves families can trace ancestry to Ireland, some can, and you may be interested in Irish records for tracing other lines also.

 

The article by Clara Kenny states: “Millions of historic Irish births, deaths and marriage records have become available to the public online for the first time.  More than 2.5 million images of old documents from the General Register Office can now be accessed for free from irishgenealogy.ie.”  “Images of the records currently cover births from 1864 to 1915, marriages from 1882 to 1940, and deaths from 1891 to 1965.  The database will be further expanded to include older records in the near future.”  All these records are free.

 

Links to other information of possible interest is included in the article.

 

OTHER NEW IRISH AND ENGLISH RECORDS

Findmypast just announced that four new National Archives of Ireland collections have been released.  These are: (1) over 181,000 records in Original Will Registers, 1858-1920; (2) over 50,000 records in Ireland, Catholic Qualification & Convert Rolls, 1701-1845; (3) over 820,000 records in Ireland Merchant Navy Crew Lists, 1863-1921; (4) over 2 million records in Ireland Valuation Office Books.  All these records are free (and will remain free) to search.  You can see their announcement here.  You can see other records free to search on Findmypast here.  These additional free records include Irish Catholic Parish Records, and all U.S. censuses.

 

Their announcement also listed additions for existing records sets, including Lincolnshire baptisms, banns, marriages, and burials.  These records are not free to view, although you are allowed to search them to find what and how many they have.  I did a check of the Lincolnshire marriages for Graves and found 1,030 on Findmypast.  I then did what seems to be the same search on Familysearch.org (which is free) and found 51,755.

 

The National Archives of Ireland website (mentioned above) can be seen by clicking here, and their viewable online record sets can be viewed on their genealogy section here.

 

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MORE ARTICLES OF GENERAL INTEREST

 

DNA TESTING IS CHALLENGING THE BRITISH SYSTEM OF HEREDITARY TITLES

According to an article in The Telegraph of Britain, a retired accountant, Murray Pringle, from Buckinghamshire has won his legal claim to be made a baronet as the result of DNA testing.  “The ruling by the Judiciary Committee of the Privy Council, sitting at the UK Supreme Court, raises the prospect of long-established official versions of aristocratic family lineage being torn up.”  This is also a warning to all of us to not assume that all published lineages are correct, and even to not assume that a published lineage is correct no matter how much documentary evidence is provided.

 

BUILDING A PERMANENT INTERNET TO PRESERVE RECORD ACCESS

An article in Wired was titled “The Inventors of the Internet Are Trying to Build a Truly Permanent Web.”  The efforts that are being made to preserve everything on the internet are interesting and very significant, and go way beyond the Wayback Machine that saves periodic snapshots of each website.

 

SECOND COUSINS ARE MAGIC

Finding family treasures can be accomplished very often by contacting first and second cousins.  See the article on the Ancestry.com blog here.  Although sometimes family records and other treasures are lost forever, often they have been passed on to other family members.  For instance, my mother always wondered where her parents married, but she never found out.  It turned out that her brother (who had little interest in family history) had that and many other records, and his granddaughter had the answer to my other’s question.  So contact and talk to second cousins and all other relatives you can find, and you are very likely to find some amazing things.

 

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INTERESTING AND HELPFUL ARTICLES IN THE FAMILYSEARCH BLOG

 

The FamilySearch blog often contains some interesting articles.  Some of the ones I noticed are mentioned below.

 

TAKE A VIRTUAL TOUR OF YOUR ANCESTORS’ HOMETOWN

You can see this here.  The author, Jennifer Fallon, wrote “When you see your ancestors in the context of their environment, they become more real to you.”  You can use online tools like Google Maps and Google Earth to tour the places your ancestors lived.  Census records, city directories, and other materials may help you find the addresses of your ancestors.  Then you can go to maps.google.com and enter the name of the town or the address you want.  This could even be an interesting school project for a younger member of your family to get them interested in family history.

 

3 TIPS FOR USING GOOGLE FOR GENEALOGY

This article discusses three ways Google can help you with your genealogical research.

           First formulate specific queries.  Formulate your question just as you would to a research librarian.

           Secord, use quotation marks and minus signs to narrow the search results.  The quotation marks tell Google to display only the exact word or phrase within the quotes, and the minus sign is used to indicate keywords that should be ignored.

           After you have developed the perfect query, set up Google alerts.  This will run your query across the internet every hour of every day until you tell it to stop.

 

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UPDATES TO THE GFA WEBSITE

 

Updated pages:

           Numerical Listing of Genealogies & Charts, charts.php

           Graves Family Books, gfabooks.php

           Y-DNA Test Results page, FTDNA_test_results.php

 

New Pages and Charts:

           Talley Family Connection to Graves, talley.php

           Y-DNA Group R1-169b SNP Tree, Y-SNP-Tree-R1-169b.pdf

 

Updated charts:

           Y-DNA I Haplogroup SNP Chart, I-Y-SNP-chart.pdf

           Y-DNA R Haplogroup SNP Chart, R-Y-SNP-chart.pdf

           Y-DNA Group R1-047 SNP Tree, Y-SNP-Tree-R1-047.pdf

           Y-DNA Group R1-169a SNP Tree, Y-SNP-Tree-R1-169a.pdf (changed from Y-SNP-Tree-R1-169.pdf)

           Y-DNA Group R1-228 SNP Tree, Y-SNP-Tree-R1-228.pdf

           Summary chart for Greaves family of Northamptonshire, England (gen. 47, 270, etc.), chart047-connections.pdf

           Chart of Descendants of Thomas Greaves of Northamptonshire, England (gen. 47), chart047.pdf

           Chart of Descendants of John Graves/Greaves of Northamptonshire, England & VA, chart270.pdf

 

New Genealogies:

           Gen. 493, Cathrine Graves, Mr. Rowe, and Adam Harder of Ontario, Canada

           Gen. 591, Richard Greaves and Maria Lambert of Liverpool, Lancashire, England, and Dublin, Ireland

 

Revised genealogies:

           Gen. 28, Greaves Family of Stepney, London, England, and Rear Adm. Thomas Graves of Charlestown, MA

           Gen. 47, Thomas Greaves and Joan ------ of Northamptonshire & Buckinghamshire

           Gen. 233, Spencer Graves of VA & KY

           Gen. 247, John Greaves of St. Mary’s Co., MD

           Gen. 289, Josiah Graves of MA

           Gen. 441, John R. Graves and Hannah Corder of TN, KY & IL

           Gen. 504, John Grave and Nancy Peat of Cumbria, England (name change from William Grave and Mary Davidson of Gilcrux, Cumbria, England)

           Gen. 784, Philip Graves and Susannah Hunsinger of MD & KY

 

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GRAVES FAMILY WINNERS IN THE U.S. ELECTIONS

 

As noted by Ron Graves of gen. 13 and 270, 3 members of the U.S. House of Representatives, all Republicans, won re-election on Dec. 8:

           Garrett N. Graves, LA, 6th District (b. 31 Jan. 1972, Baton Rouge, LA, m. Carissa ---, son of John Graves)

           Sam Graves, MO, 6th District, genealogy 270

           John Thomas (“Tom”) Graves, GA, 14th District (b. 3 Feb. 1970, St. Petersburg, FL, m. Julie ---)

In addition, Graves descendant Nicole Lowen (genealogy 77), Democrat, daughter of Anita Lowen, was re-elected to her 3rd term in the Hawaii State House.  There are undoubtedly other Graves descendants elected on Tuesday, but those are the only ones I presently know of.

 

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MORE HELPFUL ARTICLES ABOUT GENETIC GENEALOGY

 

Roberta Estes continues to write interesting and helpful articles for her DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy blog.  Some of the recent ones with their posting dates are:

Concepts – Managing Autosomal DNA Matches – Step 1, June 22, 2016

Concepts – Genetic Distance, June 29, 2016

Family Tree DNA Introduces Phased Family Finder Matches, July 7, 2016

Game of Genomes, July 18, 2016

Nine Autosomal Tools at Family Tree DNA, July 21, 2016

Concepts – Relationship Predictions, Aug. 4, 2016

Concepts – Match Groups and Triangulation, Aug. 10, 2016

Concepts – Sorting Spreadsheets for Autosomal DNA, Aug. 17, 2016

 

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