GRAVES FAMILY BULLETIN

 

Vol. 20, No. 1, April 21, 2021

 

A Free, Occasional, Online Summary of Items of Interest to Descendants of all Families of Graves, Greaves, Grieves, Grave, and other spelling variations Worldwide

 

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Copyright © 2021 by the Graves Family Association and Kenneth V. Graves.  All rights reserved.

 

Information on how to be removed from the subscription list is at the end of this bulletin.  If you received this bulletin directly, then you are already subscribed.  If you received it from a friend and want to subscribe, send an email message with your full name to kenneth.v.graves@gmail.com.

 

Click on these links to visit the GFA website and our Facebook page.

 

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CONTENTS

 

** General Comments

** DNA Day Sale at Family Tree DNA, April 19-April 26

** Fund Available to Pay for Some or All of DNA Test Cost If Needed

** Overview of the Project to Learn More About Each Major Graves/Greaves Family

** Y-DNA Group R1-168 (Genealogies 168, 169, and Others)

** Graves/Greaves People in the News

** Reverse-Engineering of the Genome of a Man Who Died in 1827

** A Concise Explanation of How to Use DNA Testing for Paternal Ancestry

** To Submit Material to this Bulletin & Other Things

 

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GENERAL COMMENTS

 

The last issue of this Bulletin was published as vol. 19, no. 9, in December 2017.  I started writing the first issue for 2018, but it was never completed and published.  Because of greatly increased personal responsibilities, the Bulletin was put on hold.  That situation has now changed, and the Bulletin will be starting again.

 

This issue will include several articles at the end from that issue that never got published, but the main contents will be about our effort to discover how all the families that descend from a common Graves/Greaves ancestor are connected, and where that common ancestor lived. Although we are continuing to do traditional genealogical research, our main tool is DNA testing.  The emphasis will continue to be Y-DNA testing, but we hope to start using autosomal test results also, including the tests at Ancestry.com, Family Finder at Family Tree DNA, and others.  For the Y-DNA testing, we will be encouraging many of those who have already taken tests to upgrade and others to take the test.

 

You may also send me questions and I will publish them with my answers when I think they may be of general interest.

 

I have added some people who have never received this bulletin before to the distribution list. If you don’t want to continue to receive it, there is an option at the end to be removed from the list.

 

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DNA DAY SALE AT FAMILY TREE DNA, APRIL 19-APRIL 26

 

A DNA sale from Family Tree DNA is finally here! A summary of the tests and upgrades that are available is below.  Our emphasis is still on Y-DNA tests to verify male ancestral lineage, to discover how genealogies descended from a common ancestor are connected, and to find earlier ancestry in the U.K. and elsewhere.

 

Recommended testing for these purposes are:

Š      Order at least a Y37 test for a male descendant with the Graves/Graves surname for any genealogy that has not yet had anyone tested.

Š      For those who have already tested, upgrade to at least Y37, but preferably to Y111 or BigY700.

Š      For those who have already taken Big Y500, upgrade to Big Y700. In most cases, that will provide much more information for matching.

 

                                          DNA DAY SALE                                                    19 Apr - 26 Apr 2021 (ends 11:59 pm PDT, UTC -7)

Single Products

Test

Standard Price

Discount Amount

DNA Day Pricing

Y37

$119

$20

$99

Y111

$249

$50

$199

Family Finder

$79

$30

$49

Big Y 700

$449

$70

$379

mt Full Sequence

$159

$20

$139

Autosomal Transfer Unlock

$19

$10

$9

 

Bundles ($9 off each additional test added to a bundle)

 

Upgrades

Upgrade Tests

Standard Price

Discount Amount

DNA Day Pricing

y12-37

$79

$20

$59

y12-67

$149

$10

$139

y12-111

$199

$50

$149

y25-37

$49

$10

$39

y25-67

$119

$10

$109

y25-111

$189

$50

$139

y37-67

$89

$20

$69

y37-111

$139

$20

$119

y67-111

$89

$10

$79

*Y12 - Big Y 700

$399

$40

$359

*Y25 - Big Y 700

$389

$40

$349

*Y37- Big Y 700

$339

$20

$319

*Y67- Big Y 700

$279

$20

$259

*Y111- Big Y 700

$239

$10

$229

Big Y500 - Big Y 700

$209

$20

$189

mtDNA-mt Full Sequence

$119

$40

$79

mtPlus-mt Full Sequence

$119

$40

$79

 

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FUND AVAILABLE TO PAY FOR SOME OR ALL OF DNA TEST COST IF NEEDED

 

The Graves DNA Project has a General Fund that may be able to pay for some or all of the testing cost if needed. If anyone wants to take a test or order an upgrade but needs financial help, let me know.

 

Also, if you would like to pay for someone else’s test or would like to donate to the fund, I will be happy to help you do so.

 

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OVERVIEW OF THE PROJECT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT EACH MAJOR GRAVES/GREAVES FAMILY

 

Testing male descendants of many of the families has allowed us to discover the main Graves/Greaves families. You can see the results of that on the master Y-DNA table at https://www.familytreedna.com/public/gravesdnastudy/default.aspx?section=ycolorized. You can find the link to that by going to the Graves Family Association website at https://gravesfa.org, hovering over the DNA tab at the top of the page, and clicking on Y-DNA Test Results, and then clicking on the link for Y-DNA Test Results on FTDNA Website.  The main groups on the page are in the following table, in order of the number of testers.

 

Y-DNA Group

No. of Testers

Genealogies Tested

Other Genealogies Needing Testing, Probably in Group

R1-228b,

Additional Testing Needed

To Put in Group

(Previously thought to be from Beeley, Derbyshire)

25

30, 62, 74, 87, 97, 98, 233, 423, 697, 820, 889, 892, 954

11, 72, 99, 100, 101, 159, 209, 226, 245, 246, 261, 278, 282, 292, 303, 346, 394, 395, 453, 506, 561, 578, 784, 829, 888, 957

Group 1

34

77, 102, 118, 150, 161, 177, 178, 220, 242, 262, 350, 354, 836

 

Group 2

34

28, 96, 124, 166, 207, 214, 238, 247, 351, 436, 726, 883

 

Group 3

27

46, 56, 94, 115, 152, 211, 215, 369, 372, 511

 

R1-168

Graves of Hertfordshire, CT & VA

54

10, 65, 107, 168, 169, 180, 752, 830

21, 135’ 158, 164, 194, 230, 244, 266, 289, 486, 609, 693

R1-047

Graves/Greaves of Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, & VA

54

47, 172, 270, 443, 549, 741, 877, 935

543, 550, 558, 618, 835, 924

I1-085

Graves/Greaves of Northern Ireland & Delaware

28

35, 50, 85, 472

300, 706, 712, 744

R1-018

Graves/Greaves of VA & SC

26

18, 49, 57, 84, 92, 103, 145, 155, 217, 223, 906

234, 286, 909

R1-083

Graves of Lincolnshire & Lynn, MA

17

83, 428, 457

60, 117, 136, 213, 254, 255, 317, 340, 348, 393, 404, 521, 584, 608, 797, 847, 869, 939, 967, 976, 977, 980, 981

R1-377

Graves/Greaves of Cambridgeshire & Cumbria

17

116, 199, 231, 374, 377, 432, 683, 793

80, 109, 139, 205, 269, 311, 433, 480, 504, 572, 600, 648, 653, 655

R1-169a

Desc. of Thomas, son of Capt. Thomas Graves

16

169

 

R1-013

Graves of VA, NC, SC, TN & KY

14

13, 148, 441

 

R1-169b

Graves of VA & Lexington, KY

11

169, 956

 

I2-078

Graves of SC, GA, AL &AR

10

48, 78, 189, 258, 381, 920

955

R1-197

Greaves of South Yorkshire & SC

9

156, 197, 336

 

R1-105

John Graves of Germany, NC & TN

9

105

15, 330, 385

R1-037

Wm. Graves of SC & TN

5

37

 

 

Future issues of the GF Bulletin will discuss various family groups and what is needed to find their earliest ancestry, where they originated, and how the variousparts of the family are related to each other.  Although most emphasis will be placed on the groups with the most testers and the greatest interest, other groups will probably be discussed also.

 

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Y-DNA GROUP R1-168

 

How to Find the Genealogies and Additional Related Information

All the genealogies can be found on the Graves Family Association website, and can be most easily found by hovering over the Research tab at the top of the page and clicking on Genealogies, Numerical Listing. (The Alphabetical Listing has not yet been updated, so is much less helpful.) This takes you to gravesfa.org/charts.php. Note also that whenever the column at the far right of that page contains a Yes, you can click on that link and see additional information such as a list of all the genealogies that are part of the same group and sometimes additional charts.

 

Objectives of the Study for Group R1-168

Š      Find or verify the placement of testers in the genealogy

Š      Find how the various genealogies that share a common Graves/Greaves ancestor are connected to each other.

Š      Find the ancestry of Capt. Thomas Graves who arrived in Jamestown, VA in 1608. That objective is in this study because the descendants through son John are believed to be the most likely genetic descendants.

o   An article about that was in the Graves Family Bulletin for May 31, 2017, at gravesfa.org/gfb19-4.htm.  Most of that discussion is still pertinent.

o   An article titled “Some Clues About the Possible Ancestry of Capt. Thomas Graves of Virginia”, by Dr. Charles Graves of Geneva, Switzerland, was published in the Graves Family Bulletin of Dec. 11, 2015, at gravesfa.org/gfb17-9.htm.  This article discusses that many of those associated with Capt. Thomas Graves in Virginia were from Hertfordshire, England, and the likelihood that Capt. Thomas Graves was also from there.

o   More discussion can be found on the GFA website by hovering over the Research tab and clicking on Ancestral Research Program. There you can find a link for Capt. Thomas Graves of VA, and one for Graves Families of Hertford/Harlow Area, Hartford, CT & VA. (Some minor updating may be needed.)

Š      Find the ancestry of the entire R1-168 group, including its position relative to all other groups on the human tree and other surname groups that are closely related.

 

How We Plan to Accomplish These Objectives

We need to find changes in chromosomes that occur over time and that can be measured by genetic testing. These changes are called mutations. The more frequently they occur, the more helpful they are. Also, the only way we can know that a mutation has occurred is the have multiple tests of the same areas within chromosomes to compare to each other, which is the reason we constantly try to get more people to test. The types of tests we will be using include the following. Of these, the first two are the easiest to use and have been the most helpful so far.

o   Y-DNA tests measuring  markers called STRs (short tandem repeats). These occur very fruently, but are much less stable than SNPs.

o   Y-DNA tests like Big Y that measure SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). These are very stable and are believed to seldom if ever change again.

o   Autosomal DNA tests like Family Finder, and the tests from Ancestry.com. We plan to use these also, but exactly how we do that still needs to be planned.

o   Mitochondrial DNA to trace female ancestry.

 

An example of a start at accomplishing these objectives is the chart for R1-168 here to show what mutations occurred and when. As can be seen, it shows where some of the mutations have occurred, but much additional testing is needed to find all of them.

 

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HOW AND WHY WE NEED MORE SNP TESTING WITH BIG Y

 

Since SNPs are so stable, they act as permanent historical markers, allowing us to create an ancestry chart of all humans. A very general chart of that can be seen on the Y-Haplogroup Chart here.  That and other charts can be seen on the Y-DNA Test Results page of the GFA website.

 

Most of the Graves/Greaves families are in haplogroup R. A detailed chart for that haplogroup is here.  The section for group R1-168 is at the bottom right of that chart. Here is a screen shot of that section.

You can see that there isn’t much detail here. The common ancestor of this family has SNP R-BY23445. Gen. 65 is shown with R-BY23445 and no additional SNP, but that is only because only one descendant of that family has taken a Big Y test. It is likely that at least one more SNP will be shown as soon as there are additional Big Y tests from gen. 65. A mutation cannot be recognized as a new SNP until at least 2 testers have been shown to have it. That is why we need at least 2 people to test for each line that we want to distinguish. Also, since what are called private variants are the mutations that are most apt to become recognized SNPs, the more of those that a Big Y test shows, that more potential there is for extending the lineage. Since Big Y700 tests a bigger part of the genome, it is apt to find more private variants. That is the main reason for upgrading to Big Y700. Another advantage of upgrading or taking Big Y700 is that it not only upgrades STR results to Y111, but it also tests for a total of 838 markers (that is, another 727 markers beyond the 111 that are the markers shown in the Y-DNA test results table). Although these additional markers aren’t as helpful as the basic 111, they still offer some potential for finding and verifying lineages and connections.

 

So, again, one of the conclusions here is that we need more people to take a Big Y test, and we need those who have already taken Big Y500 to upgrade to Big Y700.

 

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GRAVES/GREAVES PEOPLE IN THE NEWS

(in Jan. 2018)

 

Holly Greaves to be Nominated as EPA CFO

Scott Nicholas,  January 4, 2018 (from ExecutiveGov at www.executivegov.com)

 

Holly Greaves, senior adviser to the Environmental Protection Agency administrator for budget and audit, will be nominated by President Donald Trump as the next EPA chief financial officer.

The White House said Wednesday Greaves has extensive experience with federal accounting standards, financial and information technology environments as well as financial operations and management laws and regulations.

Greaves previously was lead developer of industry-specific training content at KPMG‘s federal audit practice, supporting lecturer on government accounting at George Washington University and associate for assurance and advisory services at Ernst and Young.

She received her bachelor’s degree in accounting and a master’s degree in accountancy from the University of Tennessee.

 

Death of Landon Russell Graves, from the St. Albans Messenger, Brea, California. For picture and more details, click on the link to the article.

“Landon Russell Graves, 79, passed, Dec. 28, 2017 in Brea, Calif. Landon was born March 14, 1938 in Bakersfield, Vt. He grew up on the family farm and is a graduate of Brigham Academy.

 

In May of 1959, Landon married Denise Martell of Enosburg Falls, Vt. Together they had four children Anne, Kirk, Zane and Ross. In 1988, Landon married Salley Mann together they raised two children Summer and Josh. He served in the Vermont Army National Guard, drove cattle truck, lumberjack, plowed snow and worked for IBM for 30 years before retiring in Tucson, Ariz.”

 

Landon Graves was descended from John Graves of Concord, MA, genealogy 166, via Barnabas, b. 1795, Weeks Buell, b. 1819, Jay N., b..1843, William Watson, b. 1874, Frank Clayton, b. 1906..

 

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REVERSE-ENGINEERING OF THE GENOME OF A MAN WHO DIED IN 1827

 

An article in the Jan. 22, 2018 issue of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter called my attention to this article in Science Alert.  You can read the article here.

 

Hans was born in the Caribbean in 1784, migrated to Iceland in 1802, and died in 1827.  Scientists have just managed to reconstruct part of his genome from 182 of his descendants, even though Hans’ remains have long since been lost.  One result of the study was the conclusion that Hans’ mother was originally from the Benin, Nigeria, and Cameroon region of Africa.  Although the fact that Hans’ genome would have been quite different from those of his neighbors made the task somewhat less difficult, this study demonstrates that with enough genealogical and genotype data available, reconstructing a historical genome sequence like this is possible.

 

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A CONCISE EXPLANATION OF HOW TO USE DNA TESTING FOR PATERNAL ANCESTRY

 

This is one of the articles that would have been in the first Bulletin of 2018, but may still be of interest now.

 

Mike Walsh, one of the volunteer DNA experts helping build the SNP tree of humanity and find how we are all connected, has recently provided the following guidelines and an illustration that he calls a Giant Tree of Mankind to help us better understand the value of the various types of DNA tests for paternal ancestry. He wrote:

Š      Some times people think of the Y chromosome in terms of the old Y DNA testing, but with Big Y and Y111, that has changed. Y DNA testing is expensive but it has unique characteristics.

Š      The Y chromosome is a powerful, reliable family lineage tracker, from genealogy to the ancient. Since every woman has a father the Y can track up to half of all lineages. It also has a nice affinity to surnames, land and other legal records.

Š      A combination of test types, particularly using FF to find male cousins and then applying Big Y has great potential. Big Y is a genealogical brick wall breaker.

Š      Here is a visual depiction of those messages.

 

 

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ABOUT THIS BULLETIN:

This bulletin is written and edited by Kenneth V. Graves, kenneth.v.graves@gmail.com.

 

TO SUBMIT MATERIAL TO THIS BULLETIN:

Send any material you would like to have included in this bulletin to kenneth.v.graves@gmail.com.  The editor reserves the right to accept, edit or reject any material submitted.

 

TO JOIN THE GRAVES FAMILY ASSOCIATION AND SUBSCRIBE TO THE GRAVES FAMILY BULLETIN:

There is no longer a paid membership in the Graves Family Association. To subscribe to the Bulletin, just contact Ken Graves at kenneth.v.graves@gmail.com.  We do still accept donations to defray ongoing expenses.  See the Donations link on the right side of the Graves Family Association home page for that.

 

COPYRIGHTS:

Although the contents of this bulletin are copyrighted by the Graves Family Association and Kenneth V. Graves, you are hereby granted permission, unless otherwise specified, to re-distribute part or all to other parties for non-commercial purposes only.